Author Topic: Suzuki XR440 SM40L Restoration  (Read 11372 times)

Offline addicted2oldsleds

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Re: Suzuki XR440 SM40L Restoration
« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2013, 09:29:24 PM »
Way cool Zuk. I am digging that sled. I regret selling my Suzukis and will get another soon.
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Offline zuknomad

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Re: Suzuki XR440 SM40L Restoration
« Reply #11 on: March 15, 2013, 09:58:51 PM »
Thanks, and I was sad when you parted with those Furys, addicted. Keep your eyes open, there are nice examples of most of the models that will pop up for sale.

Yeah, this XR probably peaks your interest, having a few similar elements to the race sleds in your 'Team Suzuki' thread, and specifically that sliderail suspension.
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Offline addicted2oldsleds

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Re: Suzuki XR440 SM40L Restoration
« Reply #12 on: March 18, 2013, 06:18:24 PM »
Do not feel too sad that I dumped my Fury. The damn thing kept overheating and would not run well when hot. Never could figur eit out so I let her fly. I also had a parts sled that went. If I found a nice one again, I would but it.
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Offline zuknomad

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Re: Suzuki XR440 SM40L Restoration
« Reply #13 on: March 20, 2013, 07:58:01 AM »
Well then, maybe not a Fury, Craig. I know your XR400 was a good sled, maybe another one of those? You seem to be able to sniff sleds out, so I'm sure something that trips your trigger will come along.

I didn't buy new slide pieces for the top side of my skid. The old ones didn't seem to have a lot of wear on them, although one had a little damage to the inside of it from when that cleat let go years ago. I also noticed that the guides on the track run to the inside of the rails, so I cleaned the wear strips up and switched their positions to place the unworn side faces of each toward the inside. The front and rear arm rebound buffers have also been installed...



The Arctic Cat profile 1 hifax I purchased was made to use 5/32" small head rivets, as opposed to the old wear strips, which used a 5mm large head. I found a position for the new slides that could take advantage of four of the original rivet holes in the rails on either side, including the crucial first two in the front, before making the bend to the rail bottom. I could also use the last hole at each end, if I drilled the hifax for it. Using the slide in this position also insured that all other holes in the slides would also line up 1/2 the distance between the existing rail holes and would not partially overlap any. A good thing, as a rivet won't hold in an oblong hole! 3/16" sized small-head rivets were found to roughly equate to the old metric 5mm size, so all rivet nail holes in the plastic that lined up with existing holes in the rails were enlarged slightly from 5/32" to fit them.

One little problem. My rivet gun head wouldn't fit down into the hifax recesses to keep downward pressure on the heads of the rivets as they were installed. I cut a small 1/4" drive socket in half that fit the recesses to make a spacer that I could use to push against on the rivets heads, and keep things tight...





Clamps (with cushions for the paint) were used to insure that the wear strips were sitting tight to the rails, and I worked down from front to back on each side, drilling new holes in the rails wherever a 5/32" rivet would be used, and enlarging the rivet nail holes in the hifax wherever a 3/16" would be used...



The only totally new holes drilled in the slides were the two at the ends on either side, to line up with the existing end holes in the rails.
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Offline zuknomad

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Re: Suzuki XR440 SM40L Restoration
« Reply #14 on: March 20, 2013, 09:26:20 PM »
Once I flipped the skid back over, I noticed that I may have clamped the hifax a bit too tight in a couple spots on the first rail I did, and put some boogers in the paint.  doh  Live and learn...

I trimmed the wear strip excesses off, front and rear, and rounded the sharp edges where the cuts were made. To try to reduce likely rusting under the swing arm buffers through the rivet holes, Seal-All was applied prior to securing them. I also thought it a good idea to fill the pockets on the closed ends with black silicone, as those ends would not be able to drain. More assembly to follow...



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Offline Iowaguy

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Re: Suzuki XR440 SM40L Restoration
« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2013, 05:29:30 AM »
Phil you do amazing work !!!  That will be an awesome machine when you are done.  2utp

Offline zuknomad

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Re: Suzuki XR440 SM40L Restoration
« Reply #16 on: March 22, 2013, 07:36:47 AM »
Thanks, Kent!

It is largely due to seeing pics of your XR440 sliderail here several years ago that made me want to find and restore one. So, it might be said that you are at least in part to blame! LOL!!
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Offline Iowaguy

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Re: Suzuki XR440 SM40L Restoration
« Reply #17 on: March 22, 2013, 04:20:15 PM »
Thanks, Kent!

It is largely due to seeing pics of your XR440 sliderail here several years ago that made me want to find and restore one. So, it might be said that you are at least in part to blame! LOL!!

............ and Im sure glad I found a nice one or it would look like the rest of my junk and find its place on the "to do" list  w1nc

Offline zuknomad

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Re: Suzuki XR440 SM40L Restoration
« Reply #18 on: March 23, 2013, 09:42:49 AM »
And here was one part of the 'to do' list on this sled, Iowaguy. The skid can't get completely put back together without addressing this shattered rear idler spacer, right?



Hmmm..., have another XR with the same spacers on each rear idler..., maybe steal one of those and replace it later.  Yup, pulled one of those (doing it correctly, the first time around) and the cap portion of that one broke off! Obviously, this was going to be a problem. The nylon where the cap meets the rest of spacer is a weak spot after light collisions with stuff in the snow and 39 years. Go figure.

Get on the computer, punch in key words and dimensions into some eBay searches. After a little communication with a seller to fill in info missing from their ad, I come up with with spacers from an early 2000's Yamaha. Spacer bushing is a little over 1mm in I.D. too small and 8mm too short, but is identical in O.D. to the old one (to fit a 6205 bearing). Better yet, the O.D. of the cap flange and stand-off depth of it from the bearing is very close in size, and no binding with the wheel as it rotates can take place.

So I wrap some emery cloth around a deepwell socket and sand with it, enlarging the new bushing I.D. by a millimeter, plus a hair. Sand flat the damaged portion from the better of the two old bushing pieces (happened to be 16mm), and put it where it normally sits at the end of the axle shaft. Then, cut it in place with a pipe cutter to get two equal 8mm size pieces, one for each side. Check the fit of an assembly; excellent and tight, no slop. The joint where the old and new bushing pieces meet is at just about the exact center of the I.D. of where the  bearing inner race sits. Problem solved for both idlers, plus it will go along with the new black hifax better than the old white spacers would have...



Total cost, less than $10. I ordered two more for when I do the other skid...


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Offline zuknomad

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Re: Suzuki XR440 SM40L Restoration
« Reply #19 on: March 28, 2013, 09:56:21 PM »
Started to put the skid back together, beginning with the rear axle and those idler wheels. The earlier test fit hadn't been perfect, as I had thought. There was just a hair of a gap between the backside of each bearing and a washer that acted as a stop at the adjusters on both sides. I bought a pair of correct O.D. bronze bushings slightly thicker than those washers at the hardware in SAE and ground out the I.D. of them to metric to fit the axle stubs and take up the gap. Then, the axle and wheels were installed.

Also found that the front swing arm did not fit the bracket on the left side properly. Keep in mind, this is the side that had hit an obstruction at one time in the sled's life, and was the arm we had to re-weld. A little more work with the press and some light grinding made it fit properly and pivot well.

The shock I had adapted felt too tight once test-bolted in, and didn't have free movement. Both the frame and the rear arm mounts were widened and thin stainless washers were added to the sides of both the upper and lower eyes in the mounts, to act as additional bushings for the eyes to ride on. The shock then moved more freely and friction seemed to be reduced, when re-tested.

I also cut the spring coils open all the way around each one with single-edged razorblades to insure they had not been painted closed. Doing that also broke any rust that had formed between the coils. Then I sprayed the insides of the coils with dry lube. Can't get much suspension action with spring coils that don't move. Been there before.

The new nylon bushings were inserted into the rear arm spring end perches; excess length removed, and then were secured by flanging the backsides of them.

It was finally time to grease arm bushings and shafts to complete the assembly. I used a bore cleaning rod with a cloth on the end and small paint brush to apply the grease to the tubes, shafts and bushings. Low-temp was used for all bushings and waterproof EP grease for the swing arm tubes and shafts. Both swing arm shafts got the new o-rings from Crash for grease retention. There are no grease zerts on the shaft tubes; although there are for the sliding tubes, and a correct metric-threaded replacement (also from Crash) was installed where one was missing...



There was some pretty heavy wear on the frame spring mounts from 2800 miles of the coils riding on them. Suzuki didn't use any sort of bushing there, like other manufacturers would in the future. I wrapped the end of each stub with a metal tape to beef those wear areas a bit, as you can see in the above picture. We'll see if it makes a difference.

The front arm and springs were installed first, then the rear arm with sliding tubes, springs, and finally, the shock. I used blue loctite where I thought it was needed. Pretty happy with the way the skid came out...





On to the tunnel work!

'anyone can drive a new sled, it takes some dedication to run crap'